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It’s about time I posted part two of this, a churlish attempt to navigate the history of everything (alright, mostly Western culture, especially England, but I’ve only seen certain films.If I’d seen more Scandinavian cinema, there’d probably be more vikings in this) via 100 movies. So here’s part two of three, Henry VIII to Atticus Finch…

     

31.       A Man For All Seasons (1966) – 1525-1535: Henry VIII embarks on his film epic ‘Six Weddings & Several Funerals’.

32.       Seven Samurai (1954) – 1587: In Japan’s warring states, the magnificent Kurosawa.

33.       Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007) – 1588: Cate Blanchett doesn’t give a ship, while the Spanish arm harder.

34.       Cromwell (1970) – 1640: Richard Harris as the bowl-cutted royal-rustler.

35.       The Red Violin (1998) – 1681: It begins life in Cremona, Italy, before heading to a Viennese orphanage in 1793, 1890s Oxford and 1960s Shanghai. May contain scenes of violins.

36.       The Crucible (1996) – Salem, 1692: It was this, Witchfinder General, or The Devils. Which witch is best?

37.       Catherine the Great (1995) – Russia, 1729-1796: The lovers of the Russian Queen; a Tsar is born.

38.       The Last of the Mohicans (1992) – 1757: During the French/Indian War, “I will find you.” Makes your hair stand on end.

39.    Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) – 1789: There’s a mutiny, on a ship named after coconut chocolate.

40.    Master & Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003) – 1803: During the Napoleonic Wars, Russell Crowe commands his ark. I mean ship. This one was a ship.

41.    Amazing Grace (2006) – 1807: Abolitionist William Wilberforce to be reckoned with.

42.    Waterloo (1970) – 1815: The short fella with the big hat vs the tall Brit named after a boot.

43.    Les Miserables (2012) – 1815-1832: Do you hear the people sing? Course you do, they don’t stop for the whole film.

44.    The Alamo (1960) – 1836: Remember the Alamo. You don’t? Then watch the film.

45.    The Young Victoria (2009) – 1837: Like Eastenders in the 80s, it’s the early days of the Queen Vic.

46.    12 Years a Slave (2013) – 1841-1853: Steve McQueen’s tour de force made him the film world’s greatest Steve McQueen since Steve McQueen.

47.    How The West Was Won (1962) – 1839-1889: …and where it got us.

48.    Gangs of New York (2002) – 1846-1863: The Big Apple was a small pip when Leo DiCaprio took on Daniel Day Lewis and his meat cleaver.

49.    Gone With The Wind (1939) – 1861-1877: The American Civil War, Rhett Butler and frankly my dear, Scarlett O’Hara.

50.    Lincoln (2012) – 1865: The later life of that guy from ‘Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure’.

51.    Dances With Wolves (1990) – 1870: The West is laid to rest.

52.    The Last Samurai (2003) – 1876: The East is laid to rest.

53.    Zulu (1964) – 1879: “Don’t throw… bloody spears… at me.”

54.    The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007) – 1881-1892: The title’s a spoiler.

55.    Wyatt Earp (1994) – 1880s: All is not O.K. at the Corral.

56.    Titanic (1997) – 1912: Near, far, wherever you are, you’re bound to have seen Rose letting Jack go, just after she says she’ll never let him go.

57.    The Last Emperor (1987) – 1908-1960s: Small boy, big throne, a little trouble, in big China.

58.    Doctor Zhivago (1965) – 1912-1923: World War, Russian Revolution and sumptuous snow.

59.    War Horse (2011) – 1912-1918: The armed horses.

60.    All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) – 1914-1918: All is not quiet.

61.    Michael Collins (1996) – 1916-1922: Liam Neeson as the Irish resistance leader.

62.    The Artist (2011) – 1927-1932: They can walk the walk but can they talk the talk?

63.    The Untouchables (1987) – 1931: Al Capone becomes touchable.

64.    The Grapes of Wrath (1940) – 1930s: The Great Depression and the rocky road to recovery.

65.    To Kill A Mockingbird (1962) – 1930s: The Finch job & the lynch mob.

 

Part three will follow, which, yes, will be mostly the last 70 years. Cos that’s what people make films about.

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